3D Model Reflection (4-13-2017)

I used the 3D scanning station in the CURVE lab, located in the library. This time was far easier than the first to get situated, from the angles to pinching the die into the scanner’s arms. I did two complete HD scans over the course of an hour, leaving the stitching to be done by hand, still. I plan to accomplish this Thursday morning (4/20), hopefully without needing additional scans because of time restraints. Both scans seem to have viable imprints of each side, only with uneven lengths warping the cube. I need to clean up the cube shape on the initial scan before I can stitch the new scans over to be sure all sides are represented. I am worried because after multiple sessions in the lab, I still suspect the model will still be a rough draft needing additional care. I am hoping I can scan the sides together to create a uniform cube, but I may have to settle on two incomplete cubes. We will see what the final editing session accomplishes. I am confident that my scans are better than previous scans, because there is a 3D representation. I just wish I could grasp some of the sharp lines and detailed markings on the object in the...

Object Analysis: Wooden Die

It’s likely that many of us have some sort of memory with dice, whether it was from a childhood family game night, a learning game in school, playing board games and role playing games as you got older, or maybe a quick trip to a craps table– just to name a few possibilities. The common perception of that list of dice related memories shifts as you move into adult use of dice. There’s something that happens when dice are used with the higher cognitive power of adults that makes the use seem sinister, unclean, and just plain unfitting. We see this trend as populations of dice lovers and users are pushed from the cultural norm. Even in modern time, there is something that unsettles the human mind as it considers the random roll and it’s affect on fate. It all began with Greeks simple rolling of pebbles, animal joints, shells, fruit pits or anything that could provide a random outcome when tossed. Canonically, these dice were not for the use of gaming, but used to see messages from deities about the future, instead. Soon, these shamen were considered outlaws and the trust of dice began to wane. While there was still a fascination with dice, a sinister association was borne for dice. This is, of course, far from the modern practice of dice, yet the affects of the religious exile seem to hold it’s place in our modern world. In today’s perception, gambling is the manipulation of fate and chance in order to try to earn profit. The opinion of gambling changes with the tides in American culture, yet it’s...

Timeline Relfection

The timeline I created for the die was a really fun way to continue my revolution of defining and considering the object. I decided to focus on the perceptions of dice and whether that convoluted consideration was justified. Normally, when we consider dice in the modern era we think of gaming/geek culture, childhood, and gambling. Two of the three of those categories are safely considered Other or Odd from the cultural norm. I decided to go about this timeline by keeping the background simple, but still maintain an organizational impact. The title slide is all white with black font to establish attention. I decided to upload a Google photo from my 3D model process so that the audience can see the inspiration of the timeline and have the ability to zoom on the image. For the body portion of the timeline, I decided that the background should be dark to mimic the general perception of the use of dice. From there, I decided to focus my theme on purpose. What are die used for, and how does the cultural perception of dice change because of that? Visually, it was important to keep the photos focused on depiction of the use of dice. As the passing of time occurs in the narrative, I began to use and expose technological uses and effects on dice. This means I was sure to use videos and depictions of internet in modern examples of dice use. I believe it’s, albeit subtle, an important reminder for audiences the differences between modern and old times to correlate the similarities in cultural opinion through time. Overall, I chose to keep...

3D Object Description Reflection

Describing the die was challenging, fun, and nostalgic as I began to decipher what I have within my self-canonized definition of dice. Dice have been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. Growing up in a family of five, who wasn’t scratching by enough to afford to go out, inspired my love (and sometimes obsession) with board games. We would often play games together and I remember the exhilaration of Yahtzee and the thrill of finally finding something that I could beat my brothers at. I understood the strategy of counting dice and often thrived within dice games that required that skill. Of course, I decided that none of that experience actually deserved to be in the object description. This die was not the chipping die from my parents’ monopoly set, any of the smooth die from the velvet lined Yahtzee cup, or part of my dice set from my D&D campaigns. This die wasn’t part of me, my story, or my narrative. It was part of something else, something that I probably will never have the privilege or pleasure of finding out. So, for this project, I decided to put aside my love for the dice in my life. They were now irrelevant. Now, I had to view this object as a normal, sane person. One who perhaps remembered playing a game or two through elementary school, but ultimately didn’t have dice within their daily habits. Oddly, this made me fall more in love with the object because of it’s ingenious simplicity to generate random outcomes. Which, put me close to square one– the recognition that I love this...

Twitter Essay Reflection

Twitter is a perfect vehicle for discussing the meaning of objects. The medium requires creativity in order to surpass the limitations of characters. It literally forces authors to “show not tell“. The first thing I needed to do to complete these essays was to figure out how to get the most out of 140 characters. To me, this meant finding a way to outsource information. This was done with hashtags, photos, videos, and links to outside sources. Essentially, we were tasked with how to cheat the system– how to milk every possible word out to create a short, meaningful experience. I quickly decided that the thesis of the tweet is essentially the theme of the tweet. What I mean by the theme could be defined by hashtags or photos. This means my ultimate message wasn’t being delivered by me– or my voice. I had to depend on the messages registered by other, shorter means of transmission. The first tweet was honestly my favorite to do, it’s where I felt I was most naturally creative. I used a time-sensitive hashtag to create relevance and connection with my audience (#treatyoselfthursday), and reinforced that theme by posting a video that originated that hashtag. Using that video and the hashtag lightened the prose section of the tweet, which was serious while the extra content was more humorous or self indulgent. The second tweet I decided to practice marketing practices of capitalizing on an audience that is already related to each other. By linking to the school store, I was enticing readers to visit and buy things to flaunt their pride in community, which was...
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