Exhibit Project Reflection

I did it. I finally did the final last touches on my online exhibit. The timeline, object model, object description, and object analysis are all done to the best of my ability at this time. For as cliche as it is to say, I actually learned a lot about myself, exposition, and material studies. Initially, I was worried that this project was going to be way too much to handle. After all, before this class I wrote mostly persuasive pieces. How was I supposed to interest an audience when I’m just discussing connections and feelings about an object on a large scale? I was also concerned how I was going to go about the process of creating all of these individual pieces. A semester is only about three months, and that was a lot of material to go through, explain, and present in interesting ways. I’m going to break down my process of organizing this exhibit by visual implements and organization. Visual I decided to put one of the more detailed photos I had of the object on the item description page because I wanted to ensure that the die had a realistic representation somewhere on the exhibit, and seeing as my 3D model is just a draft stepping stone, I thought the photo would be best. I put it at the beginning because I got to experience the die before discussing it, and I thought my audience could afford the same. My timeline uses an abundance of visual queues to indicate to the readers what time period or object I was talking about. On my object analysis, I...

From East to West: Tea Trade and Appropriation Writing Exercise

What comes to mind when you think of tea? Aging documents, boston tea party, herbal tea, tea cups and pots, steeping tea, anti-coffee, honey, sugar, cream, tea time, sweet tea vs unsweet tea, the cultures that pop up around tea (brittian, south) What is your working definition of cultural appropriation? Include examples if you can Utilizing an oppressed or purposely ‘othered’ practice of a culture for the intent of being unique, marketable as creative or original, and purposely ignoring the othered culture in which the practice comes from. Example: Modern Fashion and Black Culture. i.e braids, music styles,...

3D Model Reflection (4-13-2017)

I used the 3D scanning station in the CURVE lab, located in the library. This time was far easier than the first to get situated, from the angles to pinching the die into the scanner’s arms. I did two complete HD scans over the course of an hour, leaving the stitching to be done by hand, still. I plan to accomplish this Thursday morning (4/20), hopefully without needing additional scans because of time restraints. Both scans seem to have viable imprints of each side, only with uneven lengths warping the cube. I need to clean up the cube shape on the initial scan before I can stitch the new scans over to be sure all sides are represented. I am worried because after multiple sessions in the lab, I still suspect the model will still be a rough draft needing additional care. I am hoping I can scan the sides together to create a uniform cube, but I may have to settle on two incomplete cubes. We will see what the final editing session accomplishes. I am confident that my scans are better than previous scans, because there is a 3D representation. I just wish I could grasp some of the sharp lines and detailed markings on the object in the...

Object Analysis: Wooden Die

It’s likely that many of us have some sort of memory with dice, whether it was from a childhood family game night, a learning game in school, playing board games and role playing games as you got older, or maybe a quick trip to a craps table– just to name a few possibilities. The common perception of that list of dice related memories shifts as you move into adult use of dice. There’s something that happens when dice are used with the higher cognitive power of adults that makes the use seem sinister, unclean, and just plain unfitting. We see this trend as populations of dice lovers and users are pushed from the cultural norm. Even in modern time, there is something that unsettles the human mind as it considers the random roll and it’s affect on fate. It all began with Greeks simple rolling of pebbles, animal joints, shells, fruit pits or anything that could provide a random outcome when tossed. Canonically, these dice were not for the use of gaming, but used to see messages from deities about the future, instead. Soon, these shamen were considered outlaws and the trust of dice began to wane. While there was still a fascination with dice, a sinister association was borne for dice. This is, of course, far from the modern practice of dice, yet the affects of the religious exile seem to hold it’s place in our modern world. In today’s perception, gambling is the manipulation of fate and chance in order to try to earn profit. The opinion of gambling changes with the tides in American culture, yet it’s...

Exposition and Material Culture: A Natural Relationship

Through this course, I have used Material Culture Studies as an avenue to understand the varied impact of the application of exposition. Whether it was learning my own object, or reading about other people describing theirs. When reading “Unpacking My Library”, I remembered one of my first attempts of unpacking my own personal emotions about my book collection. This post was assigned as a five-minute synthesis of our class introduction, which opened discussion with begging the question: Why do we care about our stuff? What makes us care about some of our stuff more than the rest? I have to say, Walter Benjamin put my emotions and attachments much more eloquently and efficiently than my five minute mental rant of attachment. As I read the article, I felt absolute relief to see it clearly– and to know I wasn’t alone. I believe this is the purpose of Exposition: To synthesize research, with or without the use of a narrative, to create a clear expression of the topic and/or its impact. Which, is honestly a perfect marriage with how I define and understand Material Culture Studies: Expressing an object or event’s purpose while exploring the cultural meaning through time. Let’s consider this Mean Girl’s Clip from 0:00-0:11, as the girls’ employing Material Culture Studies to try and define the hierarchy of phrasing and objects. Obviously, there is the power of persuasion going on in the background– Regina knows she has established her power and ethos within the group which is why her definitions are ultimately abided by. However, taking that aspect out of the discourse, there is an interesting workshop of Material Culture Studies in their...
css.php